An analytic proposition is one that can be understood solely by reference to its terms and does not depend on any interaction with the world of experience, with the world outside the terms of the proposition.

A synthetic proposition is the opposite, one that cannot be understood except by reference to the world of experience, or in other words to the world outside the terms of the proposition.

There are arguably no true analytic propositions, as every term in every proposition depends to some degree on one’s interactions with the outside world, and not just for understanding the broader context in which such terms are used. Understanding the very definitions of terms in synthetic propositions depends on one’s interactions with the world outside the terms of such propositions.